How to Improve Writing Syntax with Software

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Overview: Word software programs, such as Microsoft Word, provide a remarkable resource for writers wishing to improve the syntactical structure of their prose.

For example, it incorporates basic grammar instruction for sentence organization, accompanied by a dictionary/thesaurus to improve spelling, vocabulary, and overall literacy, which may significantly enhance writing mechanics with persistent practice.

softwareImprove Writing

Step 1
Improve writing with dictionary definitions, a thesaurus, and tools to strengthen vocabulary. Perhaps you wish to find the definition of a word in your printed essay saved in Microsoft Word. If you right click the word using your mouse, a small window appears, featuring various options such as, “look up” and “synonyms”.

The “look up” option provides a dictionary definition of your word. The right side of your screen displays a dictionary with its meaning, usage, and word type (noun, verb, adjective) in different grammatical contexts. Your “synonyms” tab directs you to a thesaurus of synonyms or words with the same meaning. This attribute alone provides an invaluable resource to not only enhance writing, but with practice, ameliorate vocabulary knowledge, significantly enhancing verbal skills, literacy, and general language facility for effective communication.

Step 2
Revise and refine sentence quality for better writing. A green jagged line that underscores the word or phrase of your sentence usually suggests a grammatical error. Microsoft Word automatically notifies the writer of any apparent mistake, when one exists. It may show verb confusion, misused word, sentence fragment, run-on sentence, improper punctuation, or some other similar deviation from grammatical standards.

Step 3
Right click and scroll down window and select “grammar” or “about this sentence” to determine the reason for your mistake. However, it may occasionally mistake a sophisticated phrase for error. In that case, simply select, “ignore once” to ignore the sentence. The red jagged underline of a word means misspelling. Use the same principle for misspelled words, and substitute correct spelling provided. With consistent practice, expect considerable improvement in grammatical structure, style, reading comprehension, and exploitation of language.

Step 4
Consider other similar software applications. Microsoft PowerPoint incorporates the same grammatical instruction and verbal enhancing properties as Microsoft Word. Other software systems shown to improve writing syntax include GrandView, Inspiration Software, and Microsoft SharePoint programs. For example, GrandView software possesses superior organizational features, evidently equipped with “outlining capabilities” not even available to Microsoft Word (Kurtus, Ron, 1). Technology furnishes the flexibility of various software systems, many containing features that indirectly strengthen writing syntax and facilitate verbal proficiency with repetitious use.

Skill

  • Moderately Easy

Requisite Materials:

Microsoft Office or Microsoft Word computer programs

Keywords

  • Software
  • Syntax
  • Writing
  • Grammar
  • Literacy
  • Vocabulary

Reference

Resource

7 Comments
  1. Jack Eason says

    While I agree with everything you say regarding ‘Word’ Michael, there are one or two things that Microsoft’s programmers have not yet managed to fix within their excellent product. Take the words ‘its’ or ‘it’s’. No matter which way you type it, word will always underline it in either green or blue. If blue Word wants you to change its for it’s, or the opposite. So, you change it and then carry on writing the sentence only to see out of the corner of your eye that Word has once more underlined ‘its’ or ‘it’s’ again. What I’m getting at here is that ‘Word’ is constantly contradicting itself. Over the years I’ve learned to largely ignore it, otherwise I would be tearing out what is left of my hair. Great article by the way. 🙂

  2. Michael W. Staib says

    Mr. Eason, thank you for your insightful, invaluable words of wisdom. As a profoundly prodigious pedagogue, you not only challenge my intellect, but never cease to teach me something new!! As always, thank you, sir, for your resourceful response!

  3. Jack Eason says

    Pedagogue? Are you familiar with its explanation Michael?

    1. A schoolteacher; an educator.
    2. One who instructs in a pedantic or dogmatic manner.
    [Middle English pedagoge, from Old French, from Latin paedaggus, slave who supervised children and took them to and from school, from Greek paidaggos : paido-, boy; see pedo-1 + aggos, leader (from agein, to lead; see ag- in Indo-European roots).]

    I am neither a schoolteacher or educator. But thanks for thinking I am 😀

  4. Andrew Sacks says

    Michael, thank you for the great piece, informative and pragmatic as it can be for many of us.

  5. Paula Shene says

    And here I thought I was on my own except for those squiggly red lines…I agree somewhat with Jack because grammatically Word sometimes does not understand that the wrong word is used even though it’s the right spelling. Homophones are confusing to us flesh models so I can see where it will trip up a computer program which if you think about it, is only as good as the programmer.

    I, for one, am willing to go try this model out though because I tend to write in those elongated sentences that most abhor or, at least, cannot easily understand.

    Thanks for an informative article on a technology at my fingertips I was unaware existed.

  6. Michael W Staib says

    To Mr. Eason, honestly, after all this time, I still consider you a perspicacious “pedagogue,” because your comments almost always prove instructive! Thank you for displaying such a didactic, dynamic, debonaire demeanor!! Thank you Mr. Sacks–Glad you found some practical merit to the article. Ms. Shene, thank you as well for sharing what you perceived to learn! Thanks to all for your inspiring comments! My apologies to all for the unreasonably unseasonable response in not reciprocating your alacrity—practically 4.5 years overdue! I realize my expressed gratitude may seem ridiculously impertinent after waiting so long. Despite the extended delay, thank you so much for all your kind, thoughtful replies! Thanks to everyone on here for all your (presumably…logical humor intended here, as I assume arguendo with that assertion some intended generosity, though perhaps you inferred it…haha) generous, gratuitous gestures!! Thanks again! Rejoice always!! Michael

  7. Michael W Staib says

    To Mr. Eason, honestly, after all this time, I still consider you a perspicacious “pedagogue,” because your comments almost always prove instructive! Thank you for displaying such a didactic, dynamic, debonaire demeanor!! Thank you Mr. Sacks–Glad you found some practical merit to the article. Ms. Shene, thank you as well for sharing what you perceived to learn! Thanks to all for your inspiring comments! My apologies to all for the unreasonably unseasonable response in not reciprocating your alacrity—practically 4.5 years overdue! I realize my expressed gratitude may seem ridiculously impertinent after waiting so long. Despite the extended delay, thank you so much for all your kind, thoughtful replies! Thanks to everyone on here for all your (presumably…logical humor intended here, as I assume arguendo with that assertion some intended generosity, though perhaps you inferred it…haha) generous, gratuitous gestures!! Thanks again! Rejoice always!! Michael

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